BARRABAS IS REUNITED WITH HER MAST

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Barrabas survived the winter without any problems

From Adrian in Nome

Nome is baking in the midst of a massive high pressure system which is funneling heat down onto this often frozen-over land. The global warming evangelista would probably have something to say. But for the purposes of sailing the Northern Sea Route, the more heat the better. Ice reflects solar radiation whereas sea water absorbs the heat, melting the ice which creates more open water areas to absorb more heat and so on.

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In the background is Barrabas last year ready to be lifted out by the crane

Work on Barrabas has continued apace. The mast and rig are back on. Ric Kostiew used the American Independence Day holiday to help me out. First he welded the bases of the upper spreaders which were showing hairline fatigue cracking. Then, with a touch of hand at which I can only marvel, he picked up the 2-tonne mast with the ‘big’ crane and with me on deck to guide him, Ric lowered the mast into its slots on the first pass and with surgical precision – it was a staggering piece of skill.

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Barrabas will soon be cramped as fuel cans and other supplies are loaded for the final leg of the circumnavigation

Talking with the local fisherman and gold miners, whose futuristic floating contraptions suck up sand from the seabed in the gamblers’ quest for gold, I learned of a 2-part underwater, rapid-setting cement called SplashZone. Why couldn’t I find it after nine months searching on the Internet? I’ve ordered 2 quarts from Homer, a commercial fishing port down the coast. Peace of mind comes in two tubs of epoxy in case I ding the ice and put a hole in Barrabas.

Tomorrow, Barrabas is lifted back into the water – I can sense the ‘race horse’ eagerness beginning to build in her.

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